Learning Disorders and Therapy for Learning Disabilities

Learning Disorders and Therapy for Learning Disabilities

If your child is underperforming in school, it could be a sign that they are struggling with a learning disability. 

As a parent, it’s important to dig deep and try to understand the reasons behind these struggles. 

When you do so, not only will your little one feel a closer bond with you, but they will also feel encouraged by your support. 

It is estimated that one in five students have some type of learning disability.

It’s also worth noting that learning disabilities are very common and not something to look down upon. Everyone progresses at a different rate.

However, if a student does have a learning disability and it goes undiagnosed, the result may be devastating. 

For example, your child may be blamed for not trying hard enough when they simply can’t meet the task due to their disability.

Additionally, they may be scolded for their below average reading level when they simply can’t decipher words due to dyslexia. 

This can result in low self-esteem, depression, and anxiety down the line. 

And that’s not a future we wish upon your kiddo.

Below are the five most common learning disabilities:


DYSLEXIA

Dyslexia is a learning disorder that impedes a student’s ability to read and comprehend text. 

There are a variety of ways in which this disability can manifest. 

For example, some people struggle with phonemic awareness, which means they fail to recognize the way words break down according to sound. 

Similar problems can occur with phonological processing, wherein students cannot distinguish between similar word sounds. 

Other issues relate generally to fluency, spelling, comprehension, and more. 

Students may experience one reading issue or multiple issues when struggling with dyslexia.


ADHD

Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder affects more than 6.4 million children. 

While there is some debate as to whether or not ADHD is a learning disability, there is no doubt that it is a common impediment to learning. 

Students who have ADHD often have difficulty paying attention and staying on task. 

These students can be easily distracted and may have difficulty in traditional school settings. 

Experts link ADHD with the structure of the brain, and there is evidence that ADHD may have a genetic component as well. 

Unlike typical learning disabilities, which need instructional interventions, ADHD can be successfully treated with medications and behavioral therapies.


DYSCALCULIA

Math is another major area of concern when it comes to learning disabilities. 

While difficulty with reading can affect a student’s ability in math, some students also suffer from Dyscalculia, which specifically affects math capabilities. 

Dyscalculia can range from an inability to order numbers correctly to difficulties with problem solving. 

Students with math disorders may have trouble performing basic math calculations, or they may have difficulty with concepts like time, measurement, or estimation.


DYSGRAPHIA

While reading disabilities receive the most attention, writing disabilities can be equally difficult to overcome. 

These disabilities are known as Dysgraphia. 

Students with this disorder often have trouble holding a pencil correctly, and their posture may be tense while writing. 

Dysgraphia can also hinder written expression by making it challenging to organize thoughts, writing redundantly, or omitting key words. 

Additionally, it can affect basic sentence structure and grammatical awareness.


PROCESSING DEFICITS

Learning disabilities are also connected to processing deficits. 

When students have a processing deficit, they have trouble making sense of sensory data. 

This makes it hard for students to perform in a traditional classroom without added support. 

These deficits are most often auditory or visual, making it hard for students to distinguish and remember important information that’s needed to succeed.


OTHER LEARNING DISORDERS

  • Language disorders: auditory processing disorders that affects how language is processed
  • Reading or writing disability: neurological disorderS that interfere with information processing or the ability to write symbols representing language
  • Executive functioning disorder: neurological disorders that affect attention, memory, and decision making


INDIVIDUAL EDUCATION PLANS (IEPs)

Schools are required by law to make accommodations and modifications for students who meet eligibility requirements for learning disabilities. 

Sometimes parents need to advocate to make sure the school is doing their part by participating in creating an Individual Education Plan (IEP). 

Parents may need support and guidance in navigating the school system and coping with the additional stress of homework on the family. 

Sometimes two parents are in disagreement about the best course of action to take and need help from a professional to sort out the options and make the best decision. 

That’s why we’re here. 


WANT TO TALK? SPEAK WITH A LEARNING DISORDER EXPERT NOW

If you have any questions, contact one of our learning disorder specialists for a free consultation any time.

Learning Disabilities Therapists

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